Update: November 6th, 2003

The Keys of Atlantis

A Study of Ancient Unified Numerical and Metrological Systems

by Peter Wakefield Sault

Copyright Peter Wakefield Sault 1973-2003
All rights reserved worldwide

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The Keys of Atlantis

Appendix B.

The Life of Pythagoras

Not much is known for certain about Pythagoras. His life is shrouded in antiquity and a mixture of apocryphal and fantastic stories. Born on the Ionian island of Samos, he was taken at an early age by his father, Mnesarchus, to be schooled by the Chaldaeans at the Phoenician city of Tyre. Mnesarchus was himself born at Tyre and, so the story goes, was granted citizenship of Samos for bringing grain to the island during a time of famine. Pythagoras' mother, Pythais, was a native of Samos.

The Phoenicians were no unsophisticated people. International maritime traders with settlements as far away from their original homelands, now modern Lebanon and Israel, as Britain, long before the Hellenic peoples had settled the Peloponnese, they were cosmopolitan and possessed of a heritage of what was then already ancient Chaldean lore. They were the architects and builders of, amongst other constructions, the Temple of Solomon.

Pythagoras later studied at the Great Library of On, known to the Greeks as Heliopolis, a politically independent protectorate of Egypt (much as the modern Vatican City is a protectorate of Italy) where many Greeks were later to study. From there, word of his powerful intellect and of his ability on the cithara, a precursor of the modern guitar, began to spread throughout the civilised world.

At about the age of eighteen, he was kidnapped in the desert by Babylonian soldiers and taken to Babylon, where he spent the next twelve years of his life as a 'guest'. While there, he had frequent conversations with a learned magian named as Zabratos by Porphyry, Zaratas by Plutarch and Zaradas by Theodoret. Plutarch expresses the opinion that this magian was actually Zoroaster (the Hellenized form of Zarathustra, modern Zaradusht). Although there is no conclusive proof of this the chronology does not, however, eliminate the possibility. Zaradusht lived between 630 and 550 BCE.

In about 530 BCE Pythagoras settled in Crotona, a Greek colony in southern Italy. Discovery of the musical intervals has always been credited to Pythagoras but this is finally refuted in Chapter 1 of this book.


The Keys of Atlantis

Copyright Peter Wakefield Sault 1973-2003
All rights reserved worldwide

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